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Coding "Hello, World" with Windows Speech Recognition

There's a great article out on the Windows Vista beta experience portal showcasing Windows Speech Recognition by Richard Costall entitled "Look, no hands". I especially liked his demonstration of using Visual Studio 2005 via speech. In it, he points out several frustrations that I have also experienced using the program, but he proves that there are many excellent features in Windows Speech Recognition that can be used to sidestep some of Visual Studio's accessibility issues. In fact, he highlights the use of the Start Typing command as his means of actually coding the obligatory "Hello, World" application that he is demonstrating. If you're interested in more details on using the Start Typing command, be sure to take a look at my earlier post as well.

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